Hong Kong International Airport - About Us

A LEGEND UNDER THE SKY MORE THAN JUST AN AIRPORT Start Exploring Start Exploring
A LEGEND UNDER THE SKY
A LEGEND UNDER THE SKY
1911
1911
1927
1927
1930
1930
1936
1936
1942-1945
1942-1945
1955
1955
1958
1958
1975
1975
1989
1989
1991
1991
1996
1996
1997
1997
1998
1998
1999
1999
2003
2003
2004
2004
2009
2009
2010
2010
2011
2011
2013
2013
2015
2015
2016
2016
2017
2017
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1910~40s
1950~80s
1990s
2000s
2010s
1910~40s
1911
On 18 March 1911, an open, single engine Farman Biplane named "Spirit of Sha Tin" took off from a makeshift airstrip in Sha Tin. Flown by Belgian pilot Charles Van den Born, it was the first powered flight in Hong Kong.
(Photo credit: Ir James Ng)
1910~40s
1927
The site of Hong Kong's former civilian airport at Kai Tak was originally planned for an estate project but was terminated due to economic difficulties. The Hong Kong Government bought the Kai Tak site in 1927 and started building an aerodrome.
(Photo credit: Hong Kong Civil Aviation Department)
1910~40s
1930
Kai Tak Airport officially opened its doors in 1930.
1910~40s
1936
Kai Tak Airport welcomed its first commercial flight, operated by Britain’s Imperial Airways, which flew from Penang, Malaysia to Hong Kong on 24 March 1936.
(Photo credit: Hong Kong Civil Aviation Department)
1910~40s
1942-1945
During World War II, a new 1,371-metre north-south runway was built, and the existing 457-metre east-west runway was extended to the same length.
(Photo credit: Hong Kong Civil Aviation Department)
1950~80s
1955
The Hong Kong Government approved the master plan for a major expansion of Kai Tak Airport, including construction of a new runway and a passenger terminal building.
(Photo credit: Dragages Hong Kong Limited)
1950~80s
1958
Construction of the 13/31 Runway - heading northwest/southeast and stretching 2,529 metres - was completed in 1958, and the two old runways were closed. That same year, Kai Tak Airport officially adopted the name Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA).
(Photo credit: Hong Kong Civil Aviation Department)
1950~80s
1975
In 1975, the runway was further extended to 3,390 metres to meet long haul flight requirements. The 13/31 Runway was considered one of the world's most challenging runways at the time.
(Photo credit: South China Morning Post)
1950~80s
1989
Air traffic at Kai Tak Airport was growing rapidly. Catering for the long-term development of the airport and Hong Kong's economy, the Hong Kong Government announced its plan to construct a new airport at Chek Lap Kok.
(Photo credit: South China Morning Post)
1990s
1991
Construction work of the Airport Core Programme began in 1991. Apart from building a new airport at Chek Lap Kok, the programme covered 9 other projects, such as a high-speed airport railway system, a third cross-harbour tunnel between Hong Kong and Kowloon, and the new town of Tung Chung, etc.
1990s
1996
In 1996, Kai Tak was the third busiest passenger airport in the world and the first in terms of international cargo throughput - handling 29.5 million passengers and 1.56 million tonnes of freight during the year. It was operating beyond its design capacity.
1990s
1997
The new airport at Chek Lap Kok welcomed its first landing when Government Flying Service's twin engine Beech Super King Air touched down on the South Runway on 20 February 1997.
1990s
1998
At around 1:20am on 6 July 1998, Kai Tak Airport turned off its runway lights after 73 years of service. HKIA was relocated from Kai Tak to Chek Lap Kok overnight. At 6:27 am on the same day, the new airport at Chek Lap Kok saw the landing of its first commercial flight.
(Photo credit: Ir James Ng)
1990s
1999
At the time of its opening, the new airport at Chek Lap Kok operated from a single runway, but this was increased to two in May 1999. Both runways are 3,800 metres long and 60 metres wide.
2000s
2003
SkyPier and related cross-boundary ferry service commenced operation, enhancing HKIA's connectivity with the Pearl River Delta region.
2000s
2004
DHL launched its Central Asia Hub at HKIA, strengthening the airport's status as the express cargo hub of Asia.
2000s
2009
HKIA's North Satellite Concourse commenced operation.
2010s
2010
Surpassing Memphis International Airport, HKIA became the world’s busiest cargo airport.
2010s
2011
The Airport Authority Hong Kong published the HKIA Master Plan 2030 and conducted a three-month public consultation. 73% of respondents supported the proposal to expand HKIA into a three-runway system.
2010s
2013
Cathay Pacific Cargo Terminal commenced operation, increasing HKIA’s annual cargo capacity by 50%. The same year, HKIA was inducted into TTG's Travel Hall of Fame after winning its "Best Airport" Award 10 times.
2010s
2015
The Midfield Concourse commenced operation.
2010s
2016
The airport's passenger throughput reached the 70-million mark. Construction of HKIA's three-runway system kicked off on 1 August 2016 and the SKYCITY project was unveiled, introducing a 25-hectare retail, dining and entertainment development located next to HKIA.
2010s
2017
In 2017, the total cargo and airmail throughput of HKIA exceeded the mark of 5 million tonnes, making it the first airport in the world to have ever handled over 5 million tonnes of cargo and air mail in a year.
The Hong Kong International Aviation Academy opened the door in April. It was established to attract and nurture aviation talent.
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THE AIRPORT THAT NEVER SLEEPS WHERE AMAZING JOURNEYS BEGIN Start Exploring
AN AIRPORT LIKE NO OTHER
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A SMARTER & BRIGHTER FUTURE DRIVEN BY THE POWER OF INNOVATION Start Exploring
A SMARTER & BRIGHTER FUTURE
Building a Smart Airport

As one of the world’s leading airports, Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) uses the latest technology to take passenger services and airport operations to the next level.

 
 
 
HKairportshop.com Our online airport shop offers a wide array of merchandise. You can either pick them up at the airport, or have them delivered to your designated locations.
Use of iBeacons Approximately 10,000 iBeacons transmitters are installed throughout HKIA’s terminals, helping travellers navigate the airport and receive special offers from retailers and restaurants nearby.
GPS vehicle tracking A real-time GPS-based tracking system for airside motorised vehicles and ground services equipment facilitates effective deployment of resources.
Trolley monitoring and tracking system A real-time, video analytics system ensures baggage trolleys are available at the right time and the right location.
STACK@EASE A flexible loading arm helps workers load baggage safely and easily.